Self Regulation

What is Self-Regulation?

Self-regulation skill mastery is an essential developmental milestone. It includes a set of skills that allows a child to manage his emotions, control his actions, and maintain focus and attention on a task.

Children develop at different rates in all of the developmental stages and this is true for self-regulation as well. It is a complex process that is influenced by the child’s temperament, environment, and experiences. Optimally, they gain some level of mastery over these skills during the preschool years.

There Are Three Types of Self-Regulation:

  1. Emotional self-regulation is involved in how we feel emotions, how we pay attention to emotions, how we think about these feelings and how we behave. Young children gradually learn how to manage their feelings. This leads to effectively interacting with peers and adults when they are upset, frustrated, or otherwise over-stimulated.

  2. Behavioral self-regulation includes the ability to inhibit one’s actions. Examples include remembering and following rules, not hitting or biting, and sharing in play.

    1. Cognitive self-regulation is the most complex and last to develop. It begins to appear in four-year-olds as they develop their ability to plan (e.g., what they are going to do) and utilize proper responses (e.g., listening when a story is read).

    A three-year-old tells how she self-regulates:

    (Thanks to Momentus Institute)

    It is important to remember that individual differences very much impact the ability and speed with which a child learns to self-regulate.

    Why is Self-Regulation important?

    These skills are integral in how a child comes to feel about herself and her relationships with others, her ability to cope in the face of frustration, disappointment, stress and uncertainty, and her mental health.  In addition, many of the behaviors and attributes associated with successful school adjustment are related to self-regulation skills.  Popular psychologist Daniel Goleman is a great exponent of research showing that self-regulation capabilities are the biggest single determinant of life outcomes. These skills are integral in how a child comes to feel about herself and her relationships with others, her ability to cope in the face of frustration, disappointment, stress and uncertainty, and her mental health.

    How do Kids Learn Self-Regulation?

    By practicing certain kinds of exercises daily children can learn these import skills.  Traditionally, games like Red Light, Green Light, or Simon Says have been used to help facilitate this process.  We have learned that introducing both calming and focusing exercises at an early age is helpful.  It takes daily practice, gentle reminding, and patience, and with these children are successful in this learning.

    What is co-regulation?

    Children cannot regulate their emotions on their own. Parents, teachers, and caregivers are critical in helping children co-regulate big emotions.  Children need help making sense of how they feel, in understanding why they are feeling the way they do and in figuring out what they can do about it. Co-regulation relates to how we communicate with our children, the language we use and the way we respond to their difficult emotions; how we model good coping and express our own emotions; how we interpret our child’s behavior and set limits.

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